Agenda and draft minutes

Children and Young People Select Committee
Wednesday, 8th May, 2019 10.00 am

Venue: Ashburton Hall, Elizabeth II Court, The Castle, Winchester

Contact: Email: members.services@hants.gov.uk 

Items
No. Item

92.

Apologies for absence

To receive any apologies for absence.

Minutes:

Apologies were received from Councillors Briggs, Harvey and Forster. Councillor Hayre was in attendance as the Conservative Substitute Member.

 

Apologies were also received from Gareth Davies, the Primary Schools Parent Governor Representative.

 

93.

Declarations of interest

All Members who believe they have a Disclosable Pecuniary Interest in any matter to be considered at the meeting must declare that interest and, having regard to Part 3 Paragraph 1.5 of the County Council's Members’ Code of Conduct, leave the meeting while the matter is discussed, save for exercising any right to speak in accordance with Paragraph 1.6 of the Code. Furthermore all Members with a Personal Interest in a matter being considered at the meeting should consider, having regard to Part 5, Paragraph 4 of the Code, whether such interest should be declared, and having regard to Part 5, Paragraph 5 of the Code, consider whether it is appropriate to leave the meeting while the matter is discussed, save for exercising any right to speak in accordance with the Code.

Minutes:

Members were mindful that where they believed they had a Disclosable Pecuniary Interest in any matter considered at the meeting they must declare that interest at the time of the relevant debate and, having regard to the circumstances described in Part 3, Paragraph 1.5 of the County Council's Members' Code of Conduct, leave the meeting while the matter was discussed, save for exercising any right to speak in accordance with Paragraph 1.6 of the Code.  Furthermore Members were mindful that where they believed they had a Personal interest in a matter being considered at the meeting they considered whether such interest should be declared, and having regard to Part 5, Paragraph 5 of the Code, considered whether it was appropriate to leave the meeting whilst the matter was discussed, save for exercising any right to speak in accordance with the Code.

 

No declarations were made at this point in the meeting.

 

 

94.

Minutes of previous meeting pdf icon PDF 113 KB

To confirm the minutes of the previous meeting

Minutes:

The Minutes of the meeting held on 17 January 2019 were confirmed as a correct record and signed by the Chairman.

 

95.

Deputations

To receive any deputations notified under Standing Order 12.

Minutes:

The Committee did not receive any deputations.

 

96.

Chairman's Announcements

To receive any announcements the Chairman may wish to make.

Minutes:

The Chairman welcomed Ruth Snook to her first committee meeting as the special school’s parent governor co-opted member.

 

The Chairman also drew Members attention to the information forwarded to them relating to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) funding and how this was spent.  The Committee had requested this information through the Chairman of the Health and Wellbeing Board at the November Select Committee.  Members also noted from the work programme that a further update on CAMHS would be brought to the November meeting of the Committee.

 

97.

Child Exploitation Update pdf icon PDF 65 KB

To receive a presentation from the Director of Children’s Services on matters affecting child exploitation across Hampshire.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Committee received a presentation on child exploitation (Item 6 in the Minute Book) from representatives of the Director of Children’s Services.

 

The background to the Willow Team was set out and Members heard that the team had been active since September 2015 in helping to safeguard children and young people.  It was explained that Hampshire’s response to exploitation was proactive and forward thinking with a strategic response headed through four local safeguarding boards.  It was heard that the Willow Team worked closely with the Missing, Exploited and Trafficked (METT) Police Team based in Hampshire Constabulary in formulating a multi-agency response looking at intelligence and emerging threats for children and the severity of their risk.  Issues such as the long-term impacts of child exploitation were highlighted to Members which included the impact on mental health.

 

The complexities of child exploitation were explained and the different aspects of these were highlighted such as trafficking and County Lines, which children could be drawn into for varying reasons such as childhood trauma or adverse childhood experiences.  Officers also explained the models of child exploitation and the PUSH factors for exploitation which could be triggered by issues at home, school and emotional difficulties.  Members also heard that organisations in Hampshire were working hard to update information to provide a clear picture of child exploitation in Hampshire, and the presentation detailed the number of child sexual exploitation incidents in Hampshire over recent years and the increase in children arrested for drug dealing.  It was also noted that the age of children involved in such incidents was decreasing and the use of social media methodology was also highlighted.

 

Officers explained that serious and organised crime was an ongoing national issue and the National County Lines Coordination Centre had identified eight key harm areas, which were currently police led but there was a move to bring in other agencies such as social work.  With regards to County Lines, it was heard that this was a business model for organised criminal gangs nationally, and exploitation of local children was rife, who could then become trapped in a drug debt which was often difficult to escape from.

 

Officers detailed the breakdown of figures which were current as of February 2019 for the County Lines network in Hampshire separated into Northern, Western and Eastern areas.  The safeguarding approach by Children’s Services and the Police was set out as well as an explanation of the risks.  It was noted that the Willow Team work hard to find windows of opportunity to help exploited children but there were often difficulties with engagement.

 

In response to questions, Members heard:

·        That the Barnardo’s exploitation tool measures the risk of exploitation, and the distance travel tool measures progress at the start, after 6 weeks and towards the end of intervention.

·        That the Willow Team work with schools, and specific year groups to highlight potential risks of exploitation, especially if a child in that year group has become involved in exploitation.

·        That the Willow Team work  ...  view the full minutes text for item 97.

98.

New Ofsted Education Inspection Framework pdf icon PDF 87 KB

To consider a report of the Director of Children’s Services regarding the new Ofsted Education Inspection Framework.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Committee received a report and presentation (Item 7 in the Minute Book) from representatives of the Director of Children’s Services providing Members with an update on the new Ofsted Inspection Framework 2019.

Members were taken through the presentation slides and the background to the new inspection framework was set out.  Members noted that the intention of the new framework was to focus on what mattered educationally, and to seek greater transparency and clarity for schools and inspectors.  Attention was also drawn to the focus on moving away from defining educational outcomes solely in terms of performance data results and emphasising the outcomes of education resulting from all their experiences of the curriculum and school life. 

The presentation also highlighted that the new framework was very similar to the existing framework and the main features that would remain the same were detailed.  Attention was drawn to the references in the draft documentation to poor leadership practices, and Members heard that these related to inclusion and curriculum narrowing.  The key changes to the current framework were also highlighted as well as the proposed changes to the administration of inspections.  In terms of the proposed changes, Officers highlighted that one of the changes would see Section 8, monitoring inspections lasting two days. The current one day “light touch” was seen as difficult to manage.  Other proposed changes were detailed as well as the potential risks of each.  Specific changes to the early years and post 16 elements of the framework were set out, and in terms of early years it was heard that there would be a focus on the characteristics of effective learning.  It was noted that how children learn, would be given the same importance as what they learnt, and interaction with adults and the environment was also seen as developmentally critical for children.  The potential risks to the post 16 elements were detailed, which included limited emphasis on careers and employability and the question of whether sixth forms and colleges were always evaluated consistently.

Officers drew Members attention to the five key consultation questions, and these were summarised.  The curriculum would be given prominent attention in judging the quality of education, and key points were raised which included that teaching should ensure learning was challenging and sequentially built upon prior curriculum experiences.  In relation to inspector’s evidence gathering, emphasis would be placed on collecting first hand evidence of children’s acquisition of knowledge, understanding and skills rather than internal performance data.  Members heard there would be a shift away from focusing on performance data as the key judgement criterion.

Key themes of the proposed framework were set out, and these included behaviour and attitudes, personal development and leadership.  It was noted that whilst the framework covered attitudes to learning and behaviour expectations, there was no mention of social emotional and mental health needs, and the issue of exclusion as “last resort” was detailed.  Members noted the personal development aspect of the framework and it was heard that currently Personal, Social  ...  view the full minutes text for item 98.

99.

Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) 0-25 Reforms Update Report - SEN Performance and Joint Working pdf icon PDF 3 MB

To consider a report of the Director of Children’s Services giving an update on the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) 0-25 Reforms – SEN Performance and Joint Working.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Members received an update from representatives of the Director of Children’s Services and Hampshire and Isle of Wight Partnership of Clinical Commissioning Groups (Item 8 in the Minute Book). 

 

Members were taken through the presentation slides and Officers first set out the context of the SEND reforms which came into effect following the Children and Families Act in September 2014.  The strong focus on year 9 preparation for adulthood was highlighted as well as other issues such as the statutory local offer and the strengthened focus on SEN support.  Members also noted the need for joint planning and commissioning of services.  Officers detailed the impact of the reforms and it was heard that these had been welcomed and that parents and young people had been involved in the planning of these.  One of the impacts had been a 66% increase in the number of Education, Health and Care Plans (EHCPs) since 2015 with these now totalling 8,300.  It was heard that this could be explained by the increase in the age range from 19 years to 25 years. 

 

The breakdown of the number of SEN statements and EHCP’s by age group was noted and it was stated that the number of young people with EHCP’s was continuing to grow but there was not such a significant growth shown at secondary age.

 

It was heard that in terms of SEN service performance, Hampshire had seen a 100% completion of statutory transfers of 5,277 SEN’s to EHCP’s by 31 August 2018.  Officers explained that the volume of work for the service was huge, but a high number of children who needed SEN places had had these secured. 

 

Members were informed about the launch of the digital EHC hub which provided a digital way of working and parents would be able to track SEN progress online.  It was heard that this had been launched with a phased rollout since September 2018 to ensure a smoother process, and that all new SEN requests had been inputted on the hub since September.  The performance of children and young people with SEN was detailed and Members also heard about the methods to manage demand with increased capacity within HIAS and examining what could be done in terms of training.

 

The presentation also highlighted the proportion of children and young people for whom needs were met by way of specialist provision out of county.  In most case this was because specialist provision wasn’t available at that point in time or the need was for a specific specialist support which was not available in county.  Members noted that 118 annual reviews were attended in the academic year 2017/18 with 46 cases identified as ready to move on and have their needs met in county.

 

It was heard that the Department for Education had earmarked £6.4m of capital funding for SEND provision between 2017-2020 to support new school places and suitability.   Autism Spectrum Disorder

 

In response to questions, Members heard:

 

100.

Work Programme pdf icon PDF 86 KB

To consider and approve the Children and Young People Select Committee Work Programme.

 

Minutes:

The Director of Transformation and Governance presented the Committee’s work programme (see Item 9 in the Minute Book).

 

In response to a Member query, it was confirmed that the update on elected home education would be brought to the 20 November 2019 meeting of the Select Committee.

 

A Member also queried about receiving an update on the welfare of traveller children, and Officers would explore this further.

 

RESOLVED:

 

That the Children and Young People Select Committee considered and approved the work programme.